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BREAKING: CDC Issues Advisory on Emerging Superbug – CRE: 40 to 50% Mortality Rate. 1 Year Infection Period.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is alerting clinicians of an emerging untreatable multidrug-resistant organism in the United States.

There are many forms of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), but of the 37 forms reported in the U.S., 15 have been reported in less than a year.

The CDC said the increase in CRE means health care providers need to “act aggressively to prevent the emergence and spread of these unusual CRE organisms.”

Enterobacteriaceae lives in water, soil and the human gut. These “surperbugs” have developed high levels of resistance to antibiotics – even carbapanems.

Individuals who usually develop CRE infections are those who are taking antibiotics and getting significant medical treatment for other conditions.

 

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/02/27/reports-rare-superbugs-increasing-in-us/

2012 CRE Toolkit – Guidance for Control of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a serious threat to public health.

Infections with CRE are difficult to treat and have been associated with mortality rates as high as 40-50%. 

Due to the movement of patients throughout the healthcare system, if CRE are a problem in one facility, then typically they are a problem in other facilities in the region as well.

To help protect patients and prevent transmission, CDC has released a CRE toolkit which expands on the 2009 CDC recommendations and continues to be updated as new information becomes available.

Read more: http://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/cre-toolkit/index.html

“The major concern is that an undiagnosed carrier may be admitted to hospital for totally unrelated reasons, and subsequently and unwittingly pass his CRE to other patients,” a researcher told NBC News.

http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/02/27/17105852-reports-of-rare-superbug-jump-in-us-cdc-says?lite

Superbug CRE may endure in patients one year after initial infection

Patients who tested positive for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) took an average of 387 days following hospital discharge to be clear of the organism, according to a new study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

Read more at:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-superbug-cre-patients-year-infection.html

 

DB

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  • trigon400

    ‘Aint our open borders great?
    All sorts of neat stuff gets imported, not just pedophiles, parasites & thieves.

  • Miguel Grande

    Since 80% of Amerika’s antibiotics are injected or fed to livestock, will this new disease wipe out all of the meat eaters?