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Occupy organic vegetable gardens


JB Bardot
Natural News
May 12, 2012

(NaturalNews) During World Wars I and II, private citizens were encouraged to plant Victory gardens in an effort to support the war effort and take the strain off the food industry, providing more food for citizens living at home. Little gardens popped up all over the country and they were called Victory gardens because people envisioned a victorious end to strife, sadness and hardship. Victory gardens in the U.S. produced a staggering 40% of the food supply. The Victory garden campaign resulted in 5 million gardens tended by over 20 million Americans, providing over $1.2 billion in food by the end of WWII.

Victory gardens were planted on every available plot of land — whether postage-stamp sized or covering several acres. The gardening campaign took the country by storm, with people being empowered by raising their own fresh, organic (because there wasn’t anything else back then) fruits and vegetables; coupled with the hope of victory over adversity and better times to come.

Recently, a renewed interest in creating organic home vegetable gardens has arisen in the U.S., especially with the advent of genetically modified (GM) seeds and foods taking over shelves in grocery stores across the country. Gardens of all kinds are sprouting and flourishing in containers, on backyard fences, on decks, pallets and even in the earth. Many of the new gardens are being grown with organic, heirloom seeds to avoid the suspicious pitfalls of GM seeds. Creative methods of watering and fertilizing complement new garden ideas.

What’s all the excitement about? The concept of victory over adversity in an economy that has broken millions of citizens and torn apart age-old communities still straining with the burden of war, has again reared its hopeful head from under the trash heap of discarded junk food and processed packages of chemicals and crap.

Backyard gardens promise natural foods that fortify and nurture the body and the earth; along with the freedom to choose what to plant and what to eat — offering a new version of an old way of living.

 

How to occupy your vegetable garden

How can you participate in this grassroots side of the occupy movement? Plant a garden! Even if you only have a small patio hanging 30 floors above street level in the middle of a smog-filled city, get a few containers and some good dirt and plant organic heirloom seeds to grow tomatoes and herbs.

Learn about companion planting for natural pest control. Companion planting not only helps manage insects and other bothersome critters; it’s a platform for planting seeds that help each other grow stronger and increases overall yields.

Compost, compost, compost. Throw your garden and cooking leftovers (fruits and veggies only, please) in an organic, bio-degradable compost pile and make your own dirt.

Teach your kids how to garden and grow their own food so they don’t have to be dependent on the corrupt system.

If you don’t want to garden yourself, offer some of your property to your neighbors for a community garden. Help them buy supplies in trade for some of the bounty they grow on your land.

Learn about biodynamic gardening, organic composting, heirloom seeds, raised beds, vertical gardening, natural irrigation methods, rain water collection and ideal areas for planting and pasturing fruit trees.

It doesn’t take much to plant seeds in your garden. It’s your right to choose what you put on your dining table and in your mouth, Plant a Victory garden and occupy your vegetable patch with earthly delights — big or small. Add real fruits and vegetables to your diet and put health back into your life.

Sources for this article include:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victory_garden

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/victorygarden/

http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/crops_02.html

http://www.victorygardeninitiative.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupy_movement

http://www.yesmagazine.org

About the author:
JB Bardot is trained in herbal medicine and homeopathy, and has a post graduate degree in holistic nutrition. Bardot cares for both people and animals, using alternative approaches to health care and lifestyle. You can find her on Facebook athttp://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001364941208&ref=tn_tnmn or on Twitter at jbbardot23

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