Syria’s Stonehenge: Mysterious ruins in desert could be as much as 10,000 years old – but scientists don’t dare to go near


  • Strange ‘landscape of the dead’ found 50 miles north of Damascus
  • Ruins near site of massacres north of Syria’s capital
  • Scientist unable to investigate baffling find
  • Stone circles, lines and tombs found in near-lifeless desert

A mysterious ancient building in Syria, described as a ‘landscape for the dead’ could be as old as 10,000 years ago – far older than the Great Pyramid.

But scientists have been unable to explore the ruins, unearthed in 2009, because of the conflict in the region.

The strange stone formations were uncovered in 2009, by archaeologist Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum, who came across stone lines, circles, and tombs in a near-lifeless area of desert.

The strange stone formations were uncovered in 2009, by archaeologist Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum, who came across stone lines, circles, and tombs in a near-lifeless area of desert near a much monastery (pictured) The strange stone formations were uncovered in 2009, by archaeologist Robert Mason of the Royal Ontario Museum, who came across stone lines, circles, and tombs in a near-lifeless area of desert near a monastery (pictured)

The strange formations were found around 50 miles north of Damascus. The area has been plagued by violence during the current unrest, including a massacre of 10 people in the village of Bakha north of the capitalThe strange formations were found around 50 miles north of Damascus. The area has been plagued by violence during the current unrest, including a massacre of 10 people in the village of Bakha north of the capital

 

Mason talked about the finds at Harvard’s Semitic Museum, said that more investigation is required to understand the mysterious rock structures – and how old they are – but Mason is unsure whether he will ever be able to return to the ruins.

The strange formations were found around 50 miles north of Damascus. The area has been plagued by violence during the current unrest, including a massacre of 10 people in the village of Bakha north of the capital.

Research teams have been unable to return to the area since the discovery. 

Mason thinks that the rock formations could date to the Neolithic period or early Bronze Age, 6,000 to 10,000 years ago.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2164412/Syrias-stonehenge-Mysterious-ruins-desert-10-000-years-old–scientists-dont-dare-near.html#ixzz1yqbnUHKc

Did you already share this? No? Share it now: