Though hit by tomato, Angela Merkel will be reelected German Chancellor

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Given the many problems Germany has with Muslim “refugees” and “migrants,” readers of FOTM have wondered why German Chancellor Angela Merkel is still in power. See:

Merkel’s unpopularity is evidenced in a recent incident when she was hit by a tomato during an outdoor campaign rally of about 3,000 people in Heidelberg, a university city in southern Germany.

Bloomberg News reports, Sept. 5, 2017, that according to Germany’s DPA press agency, two tomatoes were thrown, one splattering rally moderator Claudia von Brauchitsch, the other hitting Merkel on her left hip, in “an unusually rough moment in a campaign that has been punctuated by occasional vociferous protests.”

Merkel was also jeered by a small group of protesters on the edge of the crowd, who blew whistles and called her a “liar” and “betrayer of her people.”

Merkel appeared unruffled by the tomato-throwing incident and offered von Brauchitsch a tissue. In fact, the tomato didn’t even leave a stain on Merkel’s trademark tomato-red blazer. She wore the same outfit at a second campaign event in Stuttgart later that day.

Merkel has faced down demonstrators in previous campaign events, defending her open-borders refugee policy and saying that right-wing protesters “can only shout.”

So does this mean Merkel will lose the chancellorship in Germany’s upcoming federal election on September 24?

Sadly for Germany, the answer is “not likely”.

Here’s why.

The Chancellor is the head of government of the Federal Republic of Germany. Unlike the selection of the U.S. president, however, the German chancellor is not elected by the people, but by the Bundestag or Parliamen. This means that the individual who is elected Chancellor typically is a member of the majority party of the Bundestag.

In the upcoming election, voters will elect members of the Bundestag.

Merkel’s party is the Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union (CDU/CSU), the majority party in the Bundestag with 309 seats. Her three rivals and their respective political parties are (Wikipedia):

  • Martin Schultz, Social Democratic Party (SPD), 193 seats.
  • Sahra Wagenknecht and Dietmar Bartsch, of Die Linke or the Left Party, 64 seats.

According to the latest polling data on September 8, 2017, Merkel’s CDU/CSU is ahead (FT):

Even if Merkel’s CDU/CSU isn’t ahead in the polls, the two main opposition parties are no better and arguably even worse, when it comes to Germany’s open-door policy toward Muslim refugees:

  • The Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) is a non-revolutionary leftwing party favoring “democratic socialism” and “progressive” values, much like the U.S.’s Democratic Party.
  • The Left Party ( Die Linke) was formed in the 1990s by the more extreme, i.e., more leftist, members of SPD. Called “far left” by The Guardian, Die Linke contains outright Marxist-Leninist communists.

~Eowyn

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